Saturday, May 23, 2015

Leadership: Avoiding Burdensome Bureaucracies -- Douglas E. Castle

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If you choose to lead or are chosen to lead any organization comprised of Human Beings (most are), you will find your ability to achieve objectives encumbered by burdensome bureaucracies. These bureaucracies are a virtual organizational tradition built on the following behaviors and assumptions in groups:

1) the belief that a committee decision will be better than one made by an individual;

2) the "presumption a democratic process" as the righteous route to societal success;

3) excessive delegation of even the simplest of functions in the interest of jobs creation, full employment and a tendency of many managers to surround themselves with Human insulation or gatekeepers;

4) project management configured in a series formation (i.e., where each step is dependent upon a large number of preceding steps) leading to processing and decision making bottlenecks;

5) excessive specialization in tasking.

Bureaucracies grow like cancers in mismanaged companies, governments and organizations unless leadership imposes a culture comprised of performance-based incentives, individual accountability and self-management. In the three-dimensional hierarchical chart of a well-led organization, the picture resembles more of a pyramid than an ever-widening cylinder.

Remember: Bureaucracies are destroyers of focus, momentum and accomplishment. Effective management makes rapid decisions based upon well-vetted information and immediately proceeds to action instead of wading through a quagmire of bureaucratic red tape, political correctness and petty politics.

Sad Example: ISIS is taking more territory and accumulating more assets while the international anti-terrorism alliance is busily "weighing variables". Apparently actions DO speak louder than rhetoric...

Thank you, as always, for reading me.

Douglas E. Castle

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TAKING COMMAND - Douglas E. Castle

TAKING COMMAND! ACHIEVING YOUR OBJECTIVES.

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The Guide to self-mastery, goal-setting, strategic planning and decision making, leadership, management, contingency planning, leveraging assets, rule and domination, choosing allies, dealing with enemies, assessing risk, time management, negotiation... achieving personal authority, influence, wealth and success through total TRANSFORMATION.

Key Terms: Leadership, management, self-growth, self-mastery, personal power, career advancement, negotiation, winning, wealth, success

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Leadership: Strike A Power Pose - Douglas E. Castle - Taking Command

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Command Presence is a necessity for effective leadership.  In some individuals, this is intuitive; in others, it must be developed consciously through instruction. To be a leader, you must make those around you feel, beyond a doubt, that you are fully in command and control. You must get people's attention, keep their attention and have them aligned to follow your orders or instructions.

Command Presence is essentially presenting yourself as someone in authority, trusted and respected. This is partially done through the message conveyed by how you LOOK, how you CARRY YOURSELF, how you ACT, and how you SPEAK.

Body Language Is One Of The Keys To The "Appearance" Of Leadership
 

How you carry yourself portrays command presence or lack of it. Confidence is projected through your body language, and how you verbally deal with individuals and groups.
 

Walk (or stand) with your head up, eyes alert (as if focused on some object in  front of you -- as if a destination point), and your expression intent. You do not want to appear weak or vulnerable. You want to project the image of someone that knows why they are where they are, and who is trained and knows what they are doing. At the initiation of contact, do not smile.

Walk with intent. Don't shuffle your feet or use a "lazy" walk. Pick up your feet and move like you know where you are going, and that you have a purpose in going there. Walk briskly and purposefully in as straight a path as possible. In fact, before you enter a room, or ascend a platform, inspect the spatial layout to determine the straightest, most direct path to the place where you will be speaking.

You need to portray an  "I am in charge of this situation" image -- You must strike a power poseThe key is to be outwardly confident - even if on the inside you are scared out of your wits. You want your body language to convey confidence. Stand erect, with your hands on your hips and your legs shoulders' width apart, when addressing a group in a "situation room" or "briefing" environment. Accentuate your verbal points by using a closed hammer fist strike into the open palm of your other hand.

If you are behind a podium, or sitting at a desk, your posture must be erect and powerful, with shoulders squared, and face full forward. Accentuate your speech with powerful hand gestures. Always bear in mind that your physical gestures anchor your words.

To be a leader, you must consistently portray your command presence, and this is mostly done through intelligent and informed use of body language. Remember -- when you are in a position of leadership, your body language (the way you look, walk, stand, sit and gesticulate) speaks volumes.

As always, thank you for reading me.

Douglas E. Castle for The Taking Command! Blog

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Thursday, March 05, 2015

Business Leadership: Founders Versus CEOs - Douglas E. Castle

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Business Leadership: Founders Versus CEOs



Founders tend to be entrepreneurial visionaries, who strive to put their future imagery of success into a machine which we refer to as a business. Founders are largely iconoclasts, rebels and disruptive types with the gifts of imagination, intuition and planning. In contrast, most hired CEOs (many of whom are hired by founders of companies in conjunction with those companies' respective boards of directors) tend to be best at turning intangible visions and printed plans into reality through management and tactical skills. In many cases, founders are excellent strategic thinkers, but are not well-suited toward coordinating all of the moving parts necessary in order to bring a business to the point of achieving its most important objectives.

The way I tend to think about the startup or early-stage enterprise CEO job is fairly simple: In a startup, founders are typically responsible for laying out the vision for the products or services that the company offers, while the CEO is responsible for leading the company towards the execution of that vision. That execution path includes areas such as company protocols, go-to-market strategies, operational structure and many many other aspects that complement the company vision. Similarly, the most important job of a startup founder is to set up the right team and structure to take his or her company to the next level; oftentimes that team requires a new, professional CEO.

A founder may be a great assembler of wonderfully talented Human assets to form a team to fulfill his or her vision, but harnessing, positioning and coordinating the efforts of those assets requires the focused skills of a get-it-done CEO. Founders set a pace, a tone, an image and a corporate culture for the companies which they form. They tend to think outside of the proverbial box, while professional CEOs are used to performing their work within specified parameters, such as budgets, personnel, and other key business variables.

In many cases, particularly in early stages, the roles of founders and CEOs overlap, but this doesn’t imply that the situation must remain that way throughout the lifetime of the company. Certainly, in very early stages, the company founders are in the best position to execute in the original vision of the company. However, after the company reaches certain level the founder-CEOs need to objectively evaluate the best path and team that can maximize the chances of reaching the next set of goals.

NOTE: You can train a CEO but you can’t train a founder….

This is very true. As a startup founder, if you are convinced you are the best person to serve as your company CEO, you have the talent and the desire to make it work there are certainly plenty of resources at your disposal to help you become a world class CEO. Having the right advisors and consultants to support your efforts can be a determining factor in this stage. At any point, you have to be convinced that your role as CEO is the best thing for the company and is not based upon personal ambitions or a need (usually born of insecurity) to control every aspect of your creation.

NOTE: As a founder, you already hold the most important title there is…

In the startup world, there is no greater or more rewarding achievement than founding a company that makes its way to success and to changing the world. As a startup or early-stage business venture founder, focus on always doing the right thing for your company; it is counterproductive to obsess about remaining as CEO if there is a better person to execute on that role. Always remember that you already hold the best tile someone can have: Founder. Without founders, there would never be companies... and without companies infused with the vision of their founders, there would never be any purpose or job for a CEO.

Founders can give the company a Human face and personality. They may be become a charismatic component of the company's branding identity. And very importantly, founders ofttimes make excellent chairpersons because of their ability to conceptualize in "big picture" terms, to remain true to their original vision, and because of their parental dedication to nurturing the company as their minds' offspring.

As always, thank you for reading me.  - Douglas E. Castle
---------------

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Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Negotiating: Speak With One Voice

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Negotiating: Speak With One Voice

 

When you are engaged in business (or other) negotiations on behalf of your company or team, be certain that you are always negotiating with one voice. Negotiating as an entire team (or as a fragmented group) will almost always work against you and your team in arriving at agreements, settlements or arrangements with vendors, investors or any other outside third party.

Amateurs in the art and science of negotiating often speak with multiple voices when dealing with their counterparts on the other side of the bargaining table, and this usually yields poor results for the team. If your counterpart can divide you, or sees that you are of different minds, he or she will take advantage of that state by putting you in the awkward position of arguing with your own team mates, or of choosing the weakest member of the team to be his or her double agent (or emissary) to the entire group.

If you are entering into negotiations, have your team discussions in private and 1) do not allow your counterpart to either bypass the spokesperson/negotiator for your group, or 2) allow any members of your team to open up a separate channel to the other side.

Of course there are exceptions to this general rule where governments or very large entities are concerned in either intelligence-gathering operations or ambassadorial talks about major treaties and other types of multilevel arrangements. In these situations, there might be some "back-door" or covert secondary discussions behind the scenes or through the ranks for numerous reasons -- but in each of these cases, the team makes its ultimate decisions internally, in private.

In sum, if you must speak in multiple voices (on the rare occasions where this is done by deliberate design), make sure that you are privately sharing information and reaching your own internal agreements about each of the simultaneous or parallel negotiations. So if you are not speaking with one voice, speak with just one mind.

Douglas E. Castle for Taking Command! and for The Douglas E. Castle Consultancy.

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Friday, January 16, 2015

Leadership: Majority Versus Consensus - Which Is Better And Why?

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Majority Versus Consensus - Which Works Better And Why

If you are tasked with leading or commanding a team, and a group decision is called for under the circumstances (i.e., strategic planning meetings, special meetings of the board of directors, advisory sessions with your "kitchen cabinet" of advisors and experts), you must reach a decision through a discussion followed by a vote.

In voting, a majority just means the approval of the holders of greater than fifty percent of the voting interests or persons present. Consensus means a unanimous vote carved out of  brainstorming, head butting, compromise and careful crafting of the precise wording of the motion or decision to be decided upon. Consensus is generally more time-consuming and requires more wrangling, wrestling and effort to reach -- but it also means that the decision made will reflect the voice of every voting person. Unanimity is very powerful in bonding a team to itself (internally) and to the matter at issue (externally, decision by decision). Consensus requires compromise while majority usually does not.

A true consensus works better than a majority because all of the voting participants have "bought in" to the team decision. A majority, while deemed adequate to proceed along a certain path based upon a decision, leaves some participants "out in the cold" and more inclined to hamper progress or to sabotage the efforts of the majority. Frankly speaking, a majority victory leaves potential enemies in an angered, agitated or defeated state, while a consensus is the result of a true joint effort.

If you'd like to proceed along your path to achievement with the combined, cooperative and consolidated efforts of the entire team, unanimity by consensus is the surest method to keep from deviating from your master plan.

Always work toward a consensus. Always work toward compromised but all-inclusive unanimity in voting on important issues.

In closing, one of the earmarks of a great team leader is in his or her ability to moderate any topical discussions toward a consensus before a vote takes place.

Douglas E. Castle For Taking Command!
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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Increasing Trust Drives Marketing - Leadership In Marketing

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The 'Trust Factor' And Marketing


It Is Becoming Increasingly Difficult To Win Your Target Market's Trust

It is Becoming Increasingly Difficult To Convert Your Targeted Prospects To Purchasers
What You Must Do To Earn And Maintain Trust


From The Mad Marketing Tactics Blog

From The TAKING COMMAND Blog

By Douglas E. Castle




Trust is a huge asset in every business situation. It's crucial in marketing and sales.


While it's possible to do business with people who don't trust you, it takes a lot longer-- and it
usually involves complex negotiations and ridiculously detailed contracts. The objective is to
build enough trust at the outset of your branding or advertising or marketing campaign that
prospective customers or clients will gravitate toward your brand. This is becoming
increasingly difficult as people in our society are becoming less and less trusting, and
increasingly distrustful and cynical – disillusionment is the enemy you'll have to fight. If you've
been less than trustworthy in the past, your task will require much harder work over a
significantly longer (and probably more expensive) time in order to effect damage repair. There
are three basic rules:






1. Be Trustworthy




This rule seems obvious, but there's more to it than you'd think. The word "trustworthy"
literally means being "worthy" of "trust"--that is, you need to be the kind of person who
can be depended upon to follow through on commitments that you make.




Here's a quick test. Think over the past six months and list out the commitments you've
made that have fallen through the cracks. If that list is longer than one or two items, then
you're not trustworthy. It's really that simple.




If you're not trustworthy, it's a waste of time to talk about "winning trust" because any
trust that you win will be strictly temporary.




And beware: If you prove untrustworthy, the ensuing disillusionment tends to be
"sticky." If you let down people who (mistakenly) trusted you, they will remember it for
a
long time.






2. Create a Reputation




If you want to win trust, simply being trustworthy is necessary but not sufficient. To
create a reputation, you must transform your commitments (and your follow-through)
into publicly available information.




Whenever you make a commitment, send an email or letter, make blog post, or in some
other way create a kind of permanent record that you have done so. (That means, for
instance, that a brief, informal text message won't suffice.) Then do the same when
you've fulfilled that commitment.


This habit has the same effect that advertising has on an essentially good product. It
reminds people what they're getting when they do business with you and your
organization






3. Add Daily Consistency




Trust builds on consistency, which is why commitments (and their fulfilment) is so
important. If you build up more consistency, people will naturally realize that you can be
counted on.




For example: Mr. Philip Styrlund, CEO of The Summit Group, changes his voice mail
message every day to reflect his current thoughts. As for myself, I blog quite frequently
(but you probably already knew that).




When people realize that you're capable of executing a simple task, day after day, they
naturally believe--correctly--that you can be counted upon to deliver, day in and day out.




The following list comes from the blog posting titled “101Simple Ways To Build Trust”.
While each item on the list seems obvious, the underlying trick (missed by most people)
is to consistently be
honest with yourself and address every single item on the list. Okay
... get ready to scroll a bit!




How to Build Trust



1. Be honest
– if you tell the truth, your clients will trust you. Always be honest


especially when no one is looking.


2. Respect your client – treat your clients with the same respect you would show the
President of your country. Respect their time as well by never being late. If you need
help being on time, check out
How to Always Be On Time.


3. Sincerely care - when you truly care about others, it is hard not to trust you.


4. Ask open-ended questions – learn more about your client and be interested in their
answers. Open-ended questions give your client the opportunity to tell you about
themselves. Ask more questions based on the answers that you get.


5. Don’t be perfect – there is always something fishy about someone who seems to
have everything going for them. Don’t waste your energy hiding your mistakes or
weaknesses. This sends a message that you’re not hiding anything and that you want to
build trust.


6. Don’t look at your watch – we’re all on a tight schedule but looking at your watch
when someone is talking is rude. If you must be wary of the time, ask for permission to
look at your watch.
7. Find the win-win – in negotiations, always look for the win-win outcome. Win-lose
outcomes are one-time only events. When both parties win, you strengthen the
relationship.


8. Don’t hedge your answers – be definitive when you can. When you hedge your
answers, you are giving yourself an “out”. How can anyone trust you when you keep
dodging responsibility. Politicians are notorious for hedging their answers. How much
do you trust your politician?


9. Have your clients best interests in mind – clients know when you are looking out
for them and when you are looking out for yourself. It’s hard to trust you when there is a
conflict of interests.


10. Don’t show off – it puts people off and you come off like a self promoter interested
in your own success and not the success of others. This breeds resentment more than
trust.


11. Ask others to endorse you – if you prove yourself trustworthy and you offer great
products and services, don’t be afraid to ask your clients to recommend you. It’s easier
for others to trust you if someone they already trust endorses you.


12. Paraphrase what was said – giving the information back to the client in your own
words is a great way to show you were listening and to demonstrate your understanding.
People trust others who take the time to listen.


13. Be transparent – I have issues trusting people or companies who are not fully
transparent. For example: companies that deliberately hide their prices for their products
and services.


14. Call your client – relationships get weaker if you don’t nurture them. Call your
clients on a periodic basis, not only when you need to sell them something.


15. Take responsibility – when something goes wrong and it’s your fault, take
responsibility right away and focus on the next steps. It’s easier to trust someone who
owns up to their mistakes.


16. Take whatever is being said seriously – don’t dismiss another person’s problem as
being small or counter with the size of your own problems. Just listen. Whatever they
are going through is real and serious for them and you should treat it as such.


17. Add value – value is what people are willing to pay for. Keep doing great work that
adds value and others will reward you with trust.


18. Form a common enemy - when you focus on a common cause, it naturally builds
trust and rapport to deal with the issue.


19. Be poised – its hard to trust someone who gets emotional easily. Breathing helps.
20. Empathize – acknowledge the feelings behind what is being said and show


empathy. Your clients will trust you more when they feel that you understand them.
21. Make the client feel significant – this is a basic human need and if you fulfill it,
people will trust you. Always be sincere when making your clients feel important. They
can tell if you’re faking it.


22. Be accessible - when people know they can get access to you, it builds trust because
they can hold you accountable. People who I can’t reach always seem less trustworthy to
me.


23. Look people in the eye – if you constantly shift your eyes, it makes people
suspicious of you.


24. Remove distractions – if you’re meeting with clients, remove all distractions (turn
off phone, computer screen, etc.) and give them your undivided attention.


25. Have high self-esteem – be comfortable with who you are. Don’t try so hard to
impress, it makes you look wishy-washy. Be careful about these other
warning signs of
low self-esteem
.


26. Show commitment – when you show commitment, people trust you. Think of men
who propose (and actually get married), employees who sign employment contracts and
people who always show up when they say they will.


27. Say “I don’t know” - admit that you don’t know and say it upfront and direct.
You’ll get a lot of credibility for that.


28. Deliver what you promise – Do what you say you are going to do. This is one of
the best ways to build trust.


29. Use a real picture – if you have an online presence, use a real picture of yourself.
An authentic picture lets me know that you’re not afraid to put yourself out there and
you’re willing to be responsible for what you write on your website and blog.


30. Be vulnerable – trust builds when you open up. Don’t hide your human side, that’s
the side that people connect to.


31. Volunteer information – don’t wait until someone follows up to give information
that is important to them. Let them know as soon as you know.


32. Know your audience – make sure you use language that your client will understand.
If you’re not talking to a technical person, don’t use technical language.


33. Take time to explain – when your client is confused, be patient and take time to
help them understand. They’ll appreciate you for it and reciprocate the next time you’re
confused.


34. Don’t abuse privileges – as you gain more trust, you’ll be given more privileges.
Don’t abuse those privileges.


35. Don’t fidget – be aware of your body movements. Minimize your leg shakes, body
shifts and hand fidgets. It’s hard to trust someone who seems nervous or anxious.


36. Stay up-to-date – your clients’ situation, preferences and needs change over time.
It’s up to you to keep up-to-date through proactive communication. Don’t wait for your
clients to update you.


37. Give proper feedback – if you want to build trust, you need to tell your client the
truth when they make mistakes. “Yes Men” are not very trustworthy


38. Don’t name-drop – you might think this will help build your credibility but when
you a drop names, it’s a turn off. It seems like you’re using that person’s name to
compensate for your abilities. For better results, have others endorse you (#16).


39. Stand up for your client – if you feel your client is being taken advantage of in any
way, stand up for them or at the very least, inform them of what’s going on.


40. Make it personal – get out of the office and meet your clients face-to-face. You
need to get personal to build deep trust.


41. Give good advice – if your advice helps people, they’ll trust you and your advice
even more.


42. Go ABCD – go Above and Beyond the Call of Duty. I didn’t make the acronym up
but ABCD is a great strategy for building trust. Always look for ways to over deliver.


43. Don’t hard sell – You may have the best product or service out there that everyone
can benefit from but no one likes to be sold to or feel forced to do things. Build a
relationship, educate and persuade, not badger. Check out
Permission Marketing by Seth
Godin (affiliate)
or my How to Sell with Integrity Series.


44. Share ideas - when you come across good ideas, share them with your clients. Share
ideas that demonstrate your deep understanding of your clients’ needs.


45. Return calls quickly – if someone leaves a message, call them back as soon as you
can. This makes the other person feel important and makes them like and trust you more.


46. Be curious – ask questions and be genuinely interested to learn more. Resist taking
over the conversation or trying to immediately solve the problem or issue.


47. Keep secrets – if a client tells you something confidential, keep it to yourself unless
it violates your moral and ethical standards.


48. Don’t over-explain – When you over-explain, you’re trying to remove yourself
from being responsible. This is one of the best ways to lose someone’s trust.


49. Show compassion – step into the other person’s shoes. When something bad
happens to your clients, express your sympathies.


50. Value the relationship – show your client that you’re in it for the long-term and
demonstrate that you value the relationship. This may mean taking the first step in a
compromise.


51. Ask for clarification – when asked a question, always clarify it before answering.
Think Columbo – “I may be a little slow here...”


52. Know your outcome – if your goal is to build trust, then your desire to help the
client should surpass your desire to be right or to win. Remember this next time you are
trying to prove how right you are at the expense of your relationship to the client.


53. Don’t use a “fake” voice – some people I know use a “professional” voice that isn’t
their own. Use your own voice. If you don’t like how it sounds, get some voice lessons,
they work.


54. Don’t manipulate – it is possible to use the ideas on this list with the intention to
manipulate. Don’t do it because it won’t end well. It never does.


55. Don’t lie – one small lie can destroy a mountain of trust.

56. Understand that your client is unique – every person in this world is unique and


should be treated as such. A one size fits all approach rarely works.


57. Don’t finish other people’s sentences – even if they are taking a long time at it, be
patient and let them say it.


58. Don’t try too hard – when you are overly servile or deferential, it can be fairly
annoying. I find it hard to trust anyone who cannot think and act for themselves.


59. Never talk down to anyone – there is no situation where this is acceptable.


60. Be competent – always work to improve your skills. If you want to be trusted, you
need to be competent. This is especially important in a leadership role. Think back to
any bosses you’ve had that were incompetent. Did you trust them?


61. Say what you mean – if you think it’s a bad idea, say so. When you build up a
reputation of saying what you mean, people don’t have to second guess what you’re
trying to say. This helps to increase your trustworthiness.


62. Focus on your similarities – highlight what you have in common with the other
person. We like people who are similar and we trust people whom we like.


63. Listen attentively – Replay for the other person something that shows you’ve
listened carefully. This is especially effective when you bring up and help someone with
challenges they’ve told you about in previous conversations where they don’t expect you
to remember.


64. Think abundance – adopt the belief that there is enough for everyone and you are
not in competition for limited resources. Actions that reflect this belief builds trust
because you become more collaborative with those around you and work to raise people
up as opposed to putting them down.


65. Send a birthday card – there is no better way to show that you care than to
remember someone’s birthday and to get them a nice card. In this internet age, a
handwritten card goes a long way.


66. Give specific compliments – the more specific your compliment, the more sincere it
usually is. It shows that you took time to notice.


67. Start and end meetings on time – if you set up a meeting, make sure the agenda is
clear and that the meeting starts and more importantly, ends on time.
68. Be consistent – don’t change your views on a whim. It makes people distrustful.


69. Read books related to emotional intelligence - How to Win Friends and Influence
People by Dale Carnegie
and Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman are good places
to start.


70. Don’t gossip – don’t gossip about your clients, don’t gossip about others to your
clients.


71. Give freebies – if you sell a product or service, consider giving a free version of it.
It allows you to help those without resources to access your expertise. Make sure your
freebies are of high quality and valuable.


72. Remember names – there is nothing more interesting to us than our own names.
Show that you remember the other person’s name. If you need help,
check out How to
Remember Names Even If You Have Bad Memory
.


73. Trust others first – people treat you the way you treat them. Give trust first if you
want to get trust.


74. Be comfortable with silence – don’t feel obligated to fill in the silence. I know it
can be uncomfortable but let the other person think through their ideas and allow them
to break the silence first.


75. Be responsive – if someone is unable to reach you, make sure you respond within 24
hours with an acknowledgment or have a auto-reply message explaining the exact times
when you can be reached.


76. Have integrity – stick to your beliefs and values no matter what. Check out this
article on the
Importance of Keeping Integrity in the Workplace.


77. Allow others to help you – sometimes we are so focused on giving that we do not
allow others to give to us. Doing this robs them of the joy of giving. Let others give.


78. Don’t blame when things go wrong, don’t point fingers. Empower yourself by
taking responsibility and then determining what you’re going to do next. Don’t waste the
present thinking about the past that can’t be changed. A person that doesn’t blame
quickly gains the trust of others.


79. Be yourself – don’t change who you are to please other people. It’s tiring for
everyone. If you don’t know how to be yourself, check out
this article by Chris
Guillebeau
.


80. Express emotions – “just the facts” may be appropriate during an investigation but
when dealing with people, emotions add the human element which is key for building
trust


81. Pay attention – be attentive to the body language to make sure it matches the
meaning of the spoken language.


82. Don’t prejudge – listen with an open mind and take in what is being said without
coloring it with your own judgments.
83. Understand that the map is not the territory – our reality is only our perception of
reality. Understanding that everyone perceives the world differently allows us to be
more open-minded and accepting of ideas.


84. Don’t interrupt – when you interrupt, you are telling everyone that what you have
to say is more important than what anyone else has to say.


85. Get testimonials – if you do great work, ask your clients to write testimonials for
you. These are the first things I read before buying anything. Never fake testimonials.


86. Don’t be a know-it-all – you can’t possibly know how to do everything and you
don’t need to. Always be transparent about what you know and don’t imply that you
know more that you actually do. Being human is a good thing.


87. Have passion – when I see someone who is motivated by their passion and not
money, status or power, I am more inclined to trust them. Perhaps it is the feeling that
they are not trying to take anything away from me but rather they are building something
great.


88. Show loyalty – a person that demonstrates firm and constant support is usually a
person that other people want to trust.


89. Do your research – make an effort to understand your client. The more you get
them, the faster they’ll think of you as an insider. Your goal is to be invited to the inner
circle.


90. Give credit – the more credit you give to others, the more people will trust you.
There is no limit to the good man can do if he doesn’t care who gets the credit.” –
Judson B. Branch


91. Have an opinion – people who never take sides have trouble building trust because
they are not willing to take a stand.


92. Don’t expect anything in return – help people and don’t expect anything in return.
You’ll be happier for it and giving is always better than receiving.


93. Uphold accountability – trust is not about letting things slide. It’s about doing what
is best for your client.


94. Never exaggerate – it’s tempting to play up the benefits about your products and
services but exaggerations never end well. Any form of “truth stretching” is a bad idea if
you want to build trust.


95. Make things right – when you make a mistake, in addition to learning from it, you
should make it right in some way. At Pret-a-Manger, when they got my order wrong,
they gave me my order for free along with a free cup of coffee. I now go twice as often.


96. Don’t flatter – insincere compliments are one of the quickest ways to lose rapport
and trust with someone.


97. Trust yourself – you can’t give what you don’t have and you can’t get what you
don’t give (say that 5 times fast).
98. Be fair – treat people fairly. Like a good parent, don’t play favorites. Reward and
punish accordingly.


99. Help their children – if you have clients who have children, find a way to help their
kids. You can give them advice, write a letter of recommendation or give them a job.
Your deeds will definitely not be forgotten and you’ll find yourself being introduced as a
friend of the family.


100. Don’t give up – just because someone doesn’t trust you now, doesn’t mean you
can’t build it. If what you’re doing is not working, try something else. You have 101
things you can do.


101. Be enthusiastic – most people can’t fake enthusiasm. When you are enthusiastic
about what you do, people are more likely to trust you.




The Takeaway:In a difficult and disillusioned economy, with consumers (both B2B andB2C) wary of scams, poor customer service, indifferent treatment and a host of other classic deal-killers and money-losing propositions, you must differentiate yourself, your company and your brand from your prospective competitors by being exceptionally trustworthy. Being trustworthy is the basis of most referral business and client retention, and while it might cost you more in terms of time and money invested, the return on an investment in developing a reputation for being trustworthy is enormous – especially in times of tight money and competition for limited dollars.




Douglas E. Castle



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TAKING COMMAND - Douglas E. Castle

TAKING COMMAND! ACHIEVING YOUR OBJECTIVES.

http://takingcommand.blogspot.com

The Guide to self-mastery, goal-setting, strategic planning and decision making, leadership, management, contingency planning, leveraging assets, rule and domination, choosing allies, dealing with enemies, assessing risk, time management, negotiation... achieving personal authority, influence, wealth and success through total TRANSFORMATION.

Key Terms: Leadership, management, self-growth, self-mastery, personal power, career advancement, negotiation, winning, wealth, success

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

No News Is Bad News

Share this ARTICLE with your colleagues on LinkedIn .




 

NO NEWS IS BAD NEWS
In Silence, People Tend To Think The Worst
In Management And Leadership, Frequent Communication Is Essential
From An Article In The TAKING COMMAND! Blog By Douglas E. Castle

During prolonged periods of silence, people are left to wonder; that wondering leads to visualization of negative possibilities and potentials (generally speaking, and in accord with the basic insecurities of Human Beings). The longer and more absolute the silence, the more these negative thoughts tend to propagate. 

If you are a leader, manager or commander and you are silent, any one or several of the following assumptions will likely be made regarding your lack of communication – ironically, your lack of communication speaks volumes:

~ You are overwhelmed by your workload, and you are not competent to handle the enormous responsibilities of leadership;

~ You are either ignoring your responsibilities and/or are searching for another role to play in another organization;

~ You have received devastatingly negative news that you are afraid to confront or announce;

~ You are disappointed in the work being performed by your subordinates, and you are either too disgusted with them to communicate with them or you are passively/aggressively punishing those guilty parties by depriving them of your attention;

~ You have lost your impetus and momentum as a driver, and are not accomplishing anything – therefore, you've nothing about which to converse.

Any of the above suppositions, all of which are common in cases of a lack of top-down communication, are bad for your personal brand, effectiveness, and relationship with your troops (or employees). You will be rendered less of a standard-bearer and more of a bag of ballast – and those who report to you will think 1) that the ship may be sinking on your watch, or 2) that they are failing you significantly enough to be rendered unworthy of your attention.

Communication, powerful and frequent, is one of the hallmarks of a truly good leader.
Those whom you are charged with the responsibility of leading must know your status as well as their own in order for the enterprise not to fall prey to the ever-disabling rumor mill. 

Good leadership requires good communication skills as well as charisma and all of the other personality and management-style attributes we've discussed so many times before on the Taking Command Blog.

If you need a quick reminder (in the style of the late lawyer Johnny Cochran), “If you don't converse, things will get worse.” 

Whether the news is good or bad – don't ever let your troops, employees or teammates think that you are an introvert or an escapist. Introverted personalities may make for fine actuaries, but they make for poor leaders.

Douglas E. Castle

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Respond To Douglas E Castle
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TAKING COMMAND - Douglas E. Castle

TAKING COMMAND! ACHIEVING YOUR OBJECTIVES.

http://takingcommand.blogspot.com

The Guide to self-mastery, goal-setting, strategic planning and decision making, leadership, management, contingency planning, leveraging assets, rule and domination, choosing allies, dealing with enemies, assessing risk, time management, negotiation... achieving personal authority, influence, wealth and success through total TRANSFORMATION.

Key Terms: Leadership, management, self-growth, self-mastery, personal power, career advancement, negotiation, winning, wealth, success

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